Over the past two years my practise has evolved from working mainly in paper to embracing willow and exploring the endless ways that pattern and texture can be woven into structure and form. During my studies on a City and Guilds Basketry course I have been introduced to new ways of making which connects me to the land and a craft that is functional as well as beautiful. I have taken traditional basketry techniques and applied them to develop my new range of contemporary lighting. With a nod to geometric pattern, they bring natural woven texture to an interior space.

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Materials: Willow

Willow is a sustainable locally grown resource that is incredibly eco-friendly. Once cuttings are established they can be harvested every year for decades, yielding plenty of natural material for weaving with a variety of different sizes and colours.

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Harvesting willow from the land at Ruskin Mill

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I buy the majority of my willow from suppliers on the Somerset levels. An area close to where I grew up, the levels are perfect for this abundant crop due to the wetland nature of the land.

Some willow growers there have been in business for many generations, passing down knowledge of this heritage craft and working sensitively with the environment to maintain a natural balance of wildlife and high quality crop production.